2 Week News Recap – November 4th to November 18th

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2 Week News Recap – November 4th to November 18th

The President of Bolivia, Evo Morales, offers a press conference at the Quemado Palace in La Paz on August 24, 2009. Morales denied assertions by Peruvian President Alan Garcia that Bolivia and Chile have already agreed for Bolivia to have access to the sea through Chilean territory.  AFP PHOTO/Aizar RALDES (Photo credit should read AIZAR RALDES/AFP/Getty Images)

The President of Bolivia, Evo Morales, offers a press conference at the Quemado Palace in La Paz on August 24, 2009. Morales denied assertions by Peruvian President Alan Garcia that Bolivia and Chile have already agreed for Bolivia to have access to the sea through Chilean territory. AFP PHOTO/Aizar RALDES (Photo credit should read AIZAR RALDES/AFP/Getty Images)

AFP/Getty Images

The President of Bolivia, Evo Morales, offers a press conference at the Quemado Palace in La Paz on August 24, 2009. Morales denied assertions by Peruvian President Alan Garcia that Bolivia and Chile have already agreed for Bolivia to have access to the sea through Chilean territory. AFP PHOTO/Aizar RALDES (Photo credit should read AIZAR RALDES/AFP/Getty Images)

AFP/Getty Images

AFP/Getty Images

The President of Bolivia, Evo Morales, offers a press conference at the Quemado Palace in La Paz on August 24, 2009. Morales denied assertions by Peruvian President Alan Garcia that Bolivia and Chile have already agreed for Bolivia to have access to the sea through Chilean territory. AFP PHOTO/Aizar RALDES (Photo credit should read AIZAR RALDES/AFP/Getty Images)

Sarah Ambrose, Staff Writer

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In all of the busy hubbub of the school year, it can be hard to keep up with everything that’s going on in the world. Here are a few major events you may have missed between November 4th and November 18th.

Hong Kong Protests Turn Violent

A 22-year-old Hong Kong student protester died on Friday, November 8th, escalating tensions between citizens and Chinese police to new levels. Following the death, protests became more violent over the weekend. A police officer shot a protester at point-blank with live rounds. Another protester was set on fire. Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam condemned the violence, stating, “We are questioning if we can live in this city safely.” The protests, which started in March of 2019, were triggered by a new law stating that people who commit crimes in Hong Kong will be extradited to China to face a trial.

Family Killed in Mexico by Drug Cartel

On November 4th, nine members of a small Mormon community in Mexico were killed by a drug cartel. The families were ambushed on a desert road near the Sonora-Chihuahua border and six children and three mothers died. Over 200 shell casings from bullets were found on the scene and it is suspected that a fragment of the Sinaloa drug cartel was responsible for the attack. Relatives of the deceased say that this is not the first altercation between the family and the cartel, and Former Mexican Foreign Minister Jorge Castañeda claimed that they may have been targeted.

Potential Coup in Bolivia

Following accusations of a corrupt election, Bolivian President Evo Morales stepped down from his position on Sunday, November 10th. Morales had modified the Bolivian constitution to allow him to have a third presidential term, which caused a lot of outcry. Violent protests began and some members of the police turned on Morales, claiming they would not support him, which has some people claiming that Morales’ ousting was a coup. Morales fled to Mexico and received political asylum. Senator Jeanine Añez declared herself to be the interim president.

Internet Blackout in Iran

Nationwide protests began in Iran on Friday, November 15th over a sudden spike in gas prices. The day prior, the government announced that the prices would increase by as much as 300%, causing a national outcry. Protestors took to the streets and initially began posting footage on social media. A few hours later, a global connectivity tracker reported that online activity in Iran had a sudden decrease. Posts became less and less frequent as a government-imposed internet blackout began.