Frozen 2–Should Disney Have “Let It Go?”

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Frozen 2–Should Disney Have “Let It Go?”

The Frozen II movie poster, as it appears in theaters.  The movie poster was dropped in September of 2019 and sparked excitement as is was shared on various social media platforms.

The Frozen II movie poster, as it appears in theaters. The movie poster was dropped in September of 2019 and sparked excitement as is was shared on various social media platforms.

The Frozen II movie poster, as it appears in theaters. The movie poster was dropped in September of 2019 and sparked excitement as is was shared on various social media platforms.

The Frozen II movie poster, as it appears in theaters. The movie poster was dropped in September of 2019 and sparked excitement as is was shared on various social media platforms.

Emma Rockey, Staff Writer

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Warning: mild spoilers ahead! 

Six years after the film Frozen premiered, Disney finally released a sequel on November 22, 2019, with stunning animation and more songs the whole family will love. It has exceeded expectations in the box office, obtaining the highest all-time worldwide opening for an animated film and becoming the ninth highest-grossing film in 2019.  This film continued the story of Anna and Elsa, along with their friends Kristoff, Sven, and Olaf as they traveled beyond Arendelle and into the unknown in search of true answers to their past.

The movie begins with young Anna and Elsa, similarly to the first movie. They play with the snow from Elsa’s powers until they are interrupted by their mother and father.  Their father then tells them the story of when he accompanied Arendelle soldiers into the enchanted forest, where the native people live. He reveals that the two groups began fighting that day but he was saved from the fighting by a mysterious girl.  Their mother then sings them a lullaby titled “All is Found,” which then transitions to present day. Elsa is now the queen of Arendelle and shares her castle with Anna, Kristoff, Sven, and Olaf. She starts hearing a whisper beyond Arendelle, but no one she asks hears it.  She decides later that night to follow the voice and Anna insists on going with her. The rest of their friends follow suit, and this story begins. 

I believe this film was a perfect continuation of the story that began in Frozen. The music was similar to that of a musical, unlike the first movie. There wasn’t a single impactful song like “Let it Go” but instead, songs like “Into the Unknown” and “Show Yourself” will get stuck in your head. There were fewer songs throughout the film, which was disappointing, but I don’t think it took away from the viewing experience overall.  The plot was more complex; I think they wanted the movie to grow with the audience who had seen the first movie when they were young. That being said, it may have been more difficult for younger kids to understand. 

Graham Fetterolf, senior, thought there should have been more music throughout the film. “I loved the music and I listen to the soundtrack except for they could’ve had more,” Fetterolf said. He thinks that they’re catchy and fun but they don’t have the same “feel” as songs like “Let it Go” from the previous film.

Fetterolf also thought Disney “could’ve made it more childlike and kid-friendly. It’s not depressing but it was a little less Disney,” Fetterolf said.  The first movie was made for younger audiences but he’s not so sure that the sequel was the same.

Gwen Michaels, senior, also enjoyed Frozen II. “I thought it was really good, I really enjoyed the little salamander and reindeer. They were so cute,” Michaels said. She thought the plot was age-appropriate and the songs were “amazing and very well done.”

Frozen II was a beautiful continuation of the story. The complexity of the plot may have caused confusion in younger viewers but was necessary for the message presented by the film.